William A. Walker III

Pastor, Professor, Theologian

Category: Uncategorized (Page 1 of 3)

Defending the Shack (sort of…)

[This review originally appeared on the Mockingbird blog.]

It will perhaps be no surprise to many readers here to learn that, overall, The Shack is simply not a high quality film. It has already received scathing reviews by critics, and for very understandable reasons, even if the popular viewership has been moderately receptive.

A movie like Martin Scorsese’s Silence, for example, is arguably superior to The Shack, and it’s unfortunate, in my opinion, that more people will likely see the latter than the former. But unlike Silence, and this isn’t unimportant, The Shack is a film that is especially suited for older children — much more so than adults. It’s only rated PG-13, I would presume, because of the heavy thematic content: innocent suffering, murder, the problem of evil, etc.

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Tim Keller, Science Mike, and How We Believe – Missio Alliance

One of the biggest challenges for Christian mission today continues to be what I would just call the question of “how to believe.” Our church is running the Alpha Course right now, and one of the first few lessons was entitled “How can I have Faith?” Well, I’ve just read two new books that address … Continued

Source: Tim Keller, Science Mike, and How We Believe – Missio Alliance

God Wants the Church to Be More Political – Missio Alliance

As I laid out in my article the other day, the fact that so many Christians a) feel forced to endorse or vote for either Trump or Clinton and b) see this act as a Christian duty is a direct result of failed political theology in the Church. Such an attitude simply conveys that we see voting itself … Continued

Source: God Wants the Church to Be More Political – Missio Alliance

Why Christians Need to Stop Endorsing ALL Candidates – Missio Alliance

For many, this election year has already been one of the most difficult to bear in recent history. But the significant question is why it has been so difficult. It is a question of considerable theological and pastoral consequence, so Christian leaders need to be able to speak to this. The reason most people would … Continued

Source: Why Christians Need to Stop Endorsing ALL Candidates – Missio Alliance

Proclaiming the Message: Evangelism, Discipleship and the Temptation of Constantinian Christianity

[This is the transcript from a sermon that I preached yesterday (Sunday, Feb. 8th) on the New Testament lectionary readings, 1 Corinthians 9:16-23 and Mark 1:29-39. The audio is available here.]

I started teaching a class two weeks ago that some of you have attended called “Christ and Culture,” and at the beginning I basically posed this question: “how do we as Christians, and as the church, understand and relate our message, our good news, to a society that increasingly does not recognize the authority of the Christian faith?” Both of the readings today speak to the importance of proclaiming our message of good news. Jesus proclaimed the message, Paul proclaimed the message, and we’re to proclaim that same message. In many ways, there’s hardly another activity commissioned for Christians to do that produces more anxiety or reveals more insecurity than that of evangelism. Maybe it was easier in the past when a higher percentage of people in this country were going to church. It felt more natural to talk to people about faith, because it was a more routine and normal part of the national life! Of course, that is changing.

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Resisting Evil

This was a short talk I gave last Sunday morning at a retreat.

“The glory of God is human beings fully alive.” – Irenaeus

“The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.”

– John 10:10

Talking about resisting evil might sound a little bit strange in our modern world.  We tend to reserve the word evil for really atrocious stuff, like the Holocaust or the Rwandan genocide, ISIS, and so on.  We do this partly because we want to separate and distance ourselves from the most obvious and extreme forms of evil so that we’re not responsible, and so though our conscience feels clean – so that we don’t have to acknowledge the evil in our own hearts.

Early on in Church history, one Christian theologian named Augustine defined evil as simply the absence of God, or absence of good.  In other words, evil is the absence of the abundant life that Jesus promises. That may sound like a pretty tame definition at first, but it rightly emphasizes that good and evil are not equal but opposite forces. Evil only has the power that we give to it.  It’s like a parasite.  It doesn’t stand by itself.  It has to attach to something.

One of the most common metaphors for good and evil is light and darkness. I find that this is an even more helpful way to illustrate evil, because again, light and darkness don’t work the same way. If you turn on a light in the corner of a room, it can light up almost the whole area. Darkness works differently.  I can’t turn on darkness.  But I can cast a shadow by turning my back on the light.

See, God’s light shines everywhere, but God gives us the room and the freedom to resist the light by turning inward on ourselves and living in that shadow.  Individuals do this, and groups can also do this. And this darkness that we create is the breeding ground for evil. It’s the absence of the Holy Spirit, and the presence of what we might call a demonic spirit.

Just using the Holocaust illustration again – thinking about how this is probably the most radical example of evil we’ve seen in the last 100 years: A group has to circle the wagons, close in on itself, which prevents any outside light, God’s light, from coming in, and then it starts to see itself as the one, true, good, righteous group, and to see all other groups and people, or especially one other group of people – in this case, the Jews – as the enemy, as evil, and as the problem.  By locating evil outside of themselves, they, and we, become blind to the evil within.

Beginning in the Gospels, this same evil force gets personified in the figure of Satan, and Jesus himself is tempted by Satan after the Holy Spirit leads Jesus into the desert to fast for 40 days. And of course Jesus also resists evil by casting out what are called demons or “unclean spirits” in the Gospels. I will come back to Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness in a moment.

Returning the analogy of light and darkness, Jesus says, I am the light of the world! And then Jesus tells us in John 10:10 that he has come that we might have life to the full, and life abundantly. So this kind of life, full of light and abundance, full of what one author I like calls “aliveness,” is supposed to be central to the Christian faith, and to our experience of following Jesus. Honestly though, a lot of times, it’s not. Many times we don’t experience abundant life, and it may leave us frustrated and confused.  Because here’s the deal: nobody accidentally finds abundant life. You’re not just going to stumble into it, or follow your natural inclinations and fully experience it. It takes great intentionality and diligence. More than that, we often think that abundant life means the presence of comfort and the absence of suffering. Just by looking at Jesus own life though, it should be clear to us that abundant life may come with great hardship – joy and peace and contentment, but still hardship.

Another reason we miss out on abundant life, is because we fail to realize and appreciate that this life is a battle, and a war against evil. The difficulty though is understanding how this evil operates. The best illustration of how evil works that I know of is found in the story I mentioned a moment ago in Matthew 4 in which Jesus is tempted by Satan.

A few chapters later in Matthew Jesus says that the path that leads to destruction is wide and many people are on it.  This isn’t about hell or afterlife.  He’s talking about abundant life, and un-abundant life.  Then Jesus says that the path leads to abundant life is narrow and few find it!  Again, not because only a small number of people are forgiven or saved, but because only a small percentage of people actually decide to live into this truth.

Getting back to Jesus’ temptation now: You could say Jesus is tempted by the three P’s: (the worship of, or the idolatry of) Pleasure, People, and Power.  Or, borrowing from what Thomas Keating says, which I referenced in the previous post, Jesus, like all of us, was confronted with the enticement of:

  1. Comfort, survival and security (includes pleasure)
  2. esteem and admiration from others
  3. Power and control

None of these things is essentially bad, but the temptations Jesus faces are about their abuse – making these things god. I think this helps to demystify, or demythologize evil somewhat.  It doesn’t make it any less serious, but it does make it less weird and spooky.

Evil doesn’t approach on its own.  It always has a mask on, and the mask will generally fall into one of these three categories.  And once we know how evil tends to show itself and confront us, we’re much more likely to be able to resist it.

The Future of Church #11 (with Cynthia Bourgeault)

This is a post I read a while back from blogger and Anglican priest Christopher Page that I’ve been meaning to share and reblog for some time. Herein Page interviews Cynthia Bourgeault, whose book Centering Prayer and Inner Awakening I enjoyed reading while in seminary. I think this notion of the “Law of Three” holds true in so many facets of life.

The Dialectic of Holiness and Catholicity

I'd Rather Be Christlike Than Biblical

Greg Boyd on "The Real Jesus"

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